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Mann Family Dental
A Great Dentist

Sinuses and Tooth Pain

September 9, 2014
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Posted By: Dr. Russell D. Mann


There is a direct correlation between your sinuses and tooth pain, and as we head into the cold and flu season, you may experience this correlation yourself.


Sinus pressure can cause pain in your teeth simply because of their proximity to one another. Your maxillary sinus sits right on top of your upper teeth, and if they are swollen, they are going to swell into your teeth. This could make it feel like you have a toothache, but instead of it being in one tooth in particular, it’s a group of teeth that feel sore.

So if you end up at the dentist with pain, and they can’t find anything wrong with your teeth, you may want to see your primary care physician or an ear, nose, and throat specialist to see if it’s your sinuses. They may prescribe you nasal drops, washes or allergy medication to deal with your sinus problems.

Your sinus related tooth pain may not need dental work at that moment, by chronic sinus infections will affect your oral health if they are not treated properly. If your sinuses are swollen you may be unable to breathe through your nose. Breathing through your mouth for an extended amount of time can deprive it of the saliva it needs to wash away bacteria, causing cavities and decay. Also, the drainage from an infected sinus can fall into your mouth, giving you bad breath.

If you are suffering from a sinus infection, make sure you rinse out your mouth throughout the day and drink plenty of water. Try flushing out your sinuses and breathe through your nose as much as possible. And as always, brush and floss at least twice every day.

Just as sinus inflammation can cause tooth pain, tooth decay can cause symptoms in your sinuses as well. This is why it’s so important to listen to your body when you start to feel like something is off. When you visit your doctor or dentist, make sure that they investigate all possible causes for your pain. If you’re ever uncomfortable with a diagnosis, get a second and third opinion. You would never want to have surgery on your sinuses when what you really needed was a root canal.

Are you having problems with your teeth? Leave a comment below or contact our office at (603) 716-9812.

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